Queen Mary 2 weathers virtual storm in "Bristol Fashion". Tank test of scale model proves hull/propulsion design feasible for transatlantics
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Queen Mary 2 weathers virtual storm in "Bristol Fashion". Tank test of scale model proves hull/propulsion design feasible for transatlantics
Tank tests conducted on a scale model of Cunard's newbuilding, Queen Mary 2, resulted in a triumph for the new hull and propulsion design.
The 15-foot, self-propelled model weathered simulated hurricane conditions with her raked prow splitting the waves perfectly and her wake straight astern.
Designers, engineers and executives are all extremely pleased with the results of the testing, which was undertaken last week at facilities of the Dutch firm MARIN.

"We are delighted that the design performed as well as we had hoped it would," said Pamela Conover, Cunard Line president and COO.
"It's always a big step to actually put a model in the water and see the design become real.
Transatlantic service calls for speed, safety, reliability and comfort.
We designed a hybrid vessel, with classic lines above the water and very modern and innovative features below, and the design met or exceeded all our expectations,"
said Conover.

The design for QM2 is the first vessel to be propelled by four podded propellers extending beneath the hull.
The two forward pods are fixed and the two aft pods are steerable.
Utilizing this steering system, the model performed maneuvers in compliance with standards for similar vessels using different propulsion and steering systems.
Two sets of stabilizers likewise performed perfectly, smoothing the model's motion to create an enviable standard of comfort on board.

After the maneuvering tests, a series of "sea-keeping" tests were performed, to discern the hull's performance in different sea conditions.
Once again, the model brought smiles to the faces of the architects and designers, as it breasted a simulated 12-meter swell at a forward speed of 18 knots with almost no water over the bow.

"That's a hurricane condition," enthused Gerry Ellis, Manager of Newbuildings and Special Projects for Cunard Line. "She parted the sea perfectly. Absolutely brilliant!" stated Ellis.

Serge Toxopeus, Consultant Manoeuvring at MARIN, was no less enthusiastic, though perhaps a bit more clinical in his analysis: "Overall, it can be concluded that after completion of the hydrodynamic studies a reliable and feasible design was obtained," he said.

(Source: Cunard Line)


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